. Africa News .

China president in Tanzania on start of African tour
by Staff Writers
Dar Es Salaam (AFP) March 24, 2013

China's new President Xi Jinping jetted into Tanzania Sunday on the first stop of his three-nation Africa tour that underscores Beijing's growing presence in the resource-rich continent.

Xi flew into the east African nation's economic capital Dar es Salaam from Moscow, the opening stage of his first foreign trip since being anointed president 10 days ago.

The Chinese president and his Tanzanian counterpart Jakaya Kikwete on Sunday signed 16 different trade, cultural and development accords that included improvements to Tanzania's hospitals and ports, and the building of a Chinese cultural centre in Tanzania.

Xi is set to give a keynote speech on Monday covering relations with Africa before heading to Durban in South Africa to join an emerging economies summit.

He wraps up the African tour with a visit to Congo-Brazzaville.

"China-Africa cooperation is comprehensive," Xi said ahead of the trip, adding that Beijing valued "friendly relationships with all African countries, no matter whether they are big or small, strong or weak, rich or poor".

"No matter whether it is rich or poor in resources, China treats it equally and actively carries out pragmatic cooperation that benefits both sides," he said.

China is the second-largest foreign investor in Tanzania, with stakes in agriculture, coal, iron ore and infrastructure, and Xi will be keen "to showcase that China's approach to Africa is different from the West," said China expert Jonathan Holslag, head of research at the Brussels Institute of Contemporary China Studies.

"Tanzania offers Xi an important opportunity to highlight the historical dimension of the Sino-African relations. Today, China is reviving this partnership with Tanzania by investing heavily in its infrastructure", such as railways that could provide a vital link to Chinese-run mines in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Holslag said.

China's first contacts with Africa came with the sea voyages of Zheng He, a Chinese Muslim admiral who led expeditions to the east African coast in the 1400s, but little followed for centuries.

"Xi's decision to visit Tanzania first suggests that China is not merely interested in short-term economic gains, but that it is interested in developing long-lasting partnerships with African countries," said Frans-Paul van der Putten, senior research fellow at the Netherlands Institute of International Relations.

China, which has risen to become the world's second-largest economy, sources many of its raw materials from Africa. A new Chinese diaspora has seen huge numbers of traders and small business operators establish themselves across the continent, which has higher growth rates than Europe or the United States.

Chinese imports from Africa soared 20-fold in a decade to reach $113 billion last year, according to Chinese government statistics, and China became the continent's largest trading partner in 2009. Highlighting the changing relationship, Beijing hosted a summit of 48 African leaders in 2006.

In South Africa, where two-way trade totalled $59.9 billion last year -- nearly one-third of total China-Africa trade -- Xi will hold talks with President Jacob Zuma and join the leaders of Brazil, India, Russia and South Africa at the BRICS summit of emerging economies.

China has lent oil-rich Congo-Brazzaville, Xi's last stop, billions of dollars under a series of agreements, financing a 500-kilometre (300-mile) road linking the capital to commercial hub Pointe-Noire, a 120-megawatt hydroelectric dam and other projects.

A presidential source told AFP that Brazzaville considered Beijing an "essential partner" and their relationship "immaculate".

But China's presence in Africa has also been accompanied by periodic tensions.

Lamido Sanusi, governor of Nigeria's central bank, blasted China this month in an opinion piece in the Financial Times, saying the relationship was one in which Africa sold its resources for manufactured goods.

"This was also the essence of colonialism," he wrote. "The British went to Africa and India to secure raw materials and markets. Africa is now willingly opening itself up to a new form of imperialism."

China's vice foreign minister Zhai Jun, who estimated there are between one and two million Chinese entrepreneurs in Africa, acknowledged "growing pains" in the relationship, which he ascribed to causes including "lack of mutual understanding".


Related Links
Africa News - Resources, Health, Food

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Get Our Free Newsletters
Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear


Outside View: Can North Africa be saved?
Washington (UPI) Mar 21, 2013
The Jan. 16 attack on the natural-gas installation at In Amenas, Algeria, like the Sept. 11, 2012, raid on the U.S. facility in Benghazi, Libya, was the work of al-Qaida affiliates operating in the Sahel, a region in North Africa defined by both the Sahara desert and centuries of tribal warfare. Its latest iteration, responsible for more than 100,000 deaths, has been the decade-old Isla ... read more

Study: Farming by man was long in coming

Understanding the continuous corn yield penalty

UEA research reveals catastrophic loss of Cambodia's tropical flooded grasslands

Haitian farmers call for 'food sovereignty'

Great white sharks bite off far more than believed: study

Natural climate swings contribute more to increased monsoon rainfall than global warming

Globe's giant squids may be single species

Researchers Devise Hidden Dune Filters To Treat Coastal Stormwater Runoff

Dinosaur-era climate change study suggests reasons for turtle disappearance

Middle East faces alarming water loss

Drought declared in New Zealand's North Island

Monsoon failure key to long droughts in Southwest

Chinese leader Xi, Putin agree key energy deals

India is fourth largest energy consumer

'Earth Hour' evolves into springboard for wider action

The household carbon emission per capita in Northwestern China is only 2.05 tons CO2 per year

Microalgae could be a profitable source of biodiesel

Researchers building stronger, greener concrete with biofuel byproducts

Biobatteries catch breath

Biodiesel algae: Starvation diets damage health

Where, oh where, has the road kill gone?

Los Angeles drills response to 7.8 quake

Nuclear-hit Fukushima to get 20,000 cherry trees

Walker's World: The best news yet

Japan air purifier sales surge amid China smog warning

Hong Kong light pollution 'one of world's worst'

China to more than double air monitoring network

Little faith in China leaders' pollution promises

Outside View: TPP and Asian economies

China sets sights on S. America resources

U.K. envoy move eases Paraguay isolation

Chinese workers jailed for high-rise demo in Singapore

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement